Maurice Gibb

Music

ABOUT

Maurice Ernest Gibb, CBE (/ˈmɔːrɪs/; 22 December 1949 – 12 January 2003) was a British singer, songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, and record producer, who achieved fame as a member of the British pop group the Bee Gees. Although his brothers Barry and Robin Gibb were the group's main lead singers, most of their albums included at least one or two Gibb compositions, including "Lay It on Me", "Country Woman" and "On Time". The Bee Gees were one of the most successful rock-pop groups ever. Gibb's role in the group focused on melody and arrangements, providing backing vocal harmony and playing a variety of instruments. Born on the Isle of Man, Gibb started his music career in 1955 in Manchester, England, joining the skiffle-rock and roll group the Rattlesnakes which later evolved into the Bee Gees in 1958 when they moved to Australia. They returned to England, where they achieved worldwide fame. In 2002, the Bee Gees were appointed as CBEs for their "contribution to music". Following his death in 2003, Gibb's son collected his award at Buckingham Palace in 2004. Gibb's earliest musical influences included The Everly Brothers, Cliff Richard and Paul Anka; The Mills Brothers and The Beatles were significant later influences. By 1964 he began his career as an instrumentalist, playing guitar on "Claustrophobia". After the group's break-up in 1969, Gibb released his first solo single, "Railroad", but his first solo album, The Loner, has never been released.

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Source: Wikipedia // License: Creative Commons ShareAlike // Image source: AVRO CC BY-SA 3.0

Sex

male

Date Of Birth

22.12.1949

Age

53

Date Of Death

12.01.2003

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